Regulation

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The economic effects of changes in labour laws: new evidence for the UK

Summary The economic effects of labour laws have been much debated. In seeking to protect workers, do they actually end up harming them and the economy? Do they introduce rigidities and distortions into hiring decisions, causing unemployment to rise? Or do labour laws, by protecting workers from arbitrary [...]

Leapfrog logistics: digital trucking platforms, infrastructure, and labor in Brazil and China

Critical political economy analyses have principally conceptualised platforms as unproductive economic forms (rentier capital) skimming value off each intermediated transaction and/or illegitimately extracting and capitalizing user data. This scholarship has also focused heavily on extractive dimensions of global North platforms’ operations within the global South. However, a small but [...]

China’s Regulations on Algorithms

On 1 March 2022, China’s Regulations on the Administration of Internet Information Service Recommendation Algorithms entered into effect. The new Chinese provisions, consisting of 35 brief articles, constitute a sweeping and comprehensive effort to regulate the use of ‘algorithmic recommendation services’ across society – addressing spheres ranging from news and social [...]

Work in the Digital Age: Challenges of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Is it possible for progressives to present a vision of the future of work that harnesses the power of technology, but puts people at its heart? A comparative project by Max Neufeind (Das Progressive Zentrum), Jacqueline O’Reilly (University of Sussex) and Florian Ranft (Policy Network) sheds light on the impact [...]

The law-technology cycle and the future of work

Features of the ‘fourth industrial revolution’, such as platforms, AI and machine learning, pose challenges for the application of regulatory rules, in the area of labour law as elsewhere. However, today’s digital technologies have their origins in earlier phases of industrialisation, and do not, in themselves, mark a step change [...]

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